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Nordic Countries, c. 500–1000

Axel Christophersen

Axel Christopherson is Professor in Historical Archaeology at the University Museum, Department of Archaeology and Cultural History, in the Norwegian University of Sciences and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture Volume 1

Bloomsbury Visual Arts (UK), 2018

Sir Banister Fletcher chapter

...The Nordic countries are geographically and climatically diverse but linguistically and culturally closely linked by prolonged mutual contact: the countries termed as Scandinavia (Norway, Sweden and Denmark) are more integrated, whereas...

Nordic Countries, 1000–1400

Neil Kent

Neil Kent was formerly a Professor of European Cultural History in St Petersburg, Russia. He is an Academic Fellow of the Cyber Conflict Documentation Project in Washington DC, USA, based at the University of Cambridge, UK, and also an Associate Professor at L’Ecole (Special) Militaire de St-Cyr, France. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture Volume 1

Bloomsbury Visual Arts (UK), 2018

Sir Banister Fletcher chapter

...In the Nordic lands, the Bronze Age and Iron Age brought settled farming in the south and nomadic reindeer herding in the north. Waves of migration came from the south and east, including Celts, Goths and the Sami (Lapps). Trade in pelts...

The Nordic Countries, 1830–1914

Mari Hvattum

MARI HVATTUM is Professor of Architectural History and Theory at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design, Norway. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture Volume 2

Bloomsbury Visual Arts (UK), 2018

Sir Banister Fletcher chapter

...With more than a quarter of their territory north of the Arctic Circle, the Nordic topography ranges from tundra to fertile fields. In the nineteenth century, this rural region was scarcely populated, yet the capitals – Stockholm...