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Secret spaces of luxury: Ignorance, free ports, and art

Joanne Roberts

Joanne Roberts is Professor in Arts and Cultural Management and co-director of the Winchester Luxury Research Group at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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John Armitage

John Armitage is Professor of Media Arts and co-director of the Winchester Luxury Research Group at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

3

... perspective (Roberts 2013, 2018) is adopted to investigate secret spaces of luxury with the aim of evaluating their wider societal consequences. Specific attention will be given to free ports as secret spaces of luxury. Originally...

The third realm of luxury: Conceptualizing the connections between real places and imaginary spaces

Joanne Roberts

Joanne Roberts is Professor in Arts and Cultural Management and co-director of the Winchester Luxury Research Group at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
and

John Armitage

John Armitage is Professor of Media Arts and co-director of the Winchester Luxury Research Group at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

4

... The subject of the hidden, of the secret, of the unknown, or of the unknowable is a feature of the third realm of luxury. This theme is taken up in Joanne Roberts’s “Secret spaces of luxury: Ignorance, free ports, and art,” in which...

The emptying of the interior: Luxury, space, and the hotel effect in contemporary life

The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

1

... the eighteenth-century Robert Adam designed Luton Hoo in Bedfordshire (today a luxury hotel and spa). The taste was “le goût Ritz,” and Wernher was a part of the syndicate that had backed the Swiss hotelier César Ritz in creating the London landmark...

A touch of the exotic: Sensuality as luxury in the 1970s’ domestic interior

The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

0

...Introduction G. K. Chesterton, quoted in Garvey (2001: 47) The home is not the one tame place in a world of adventure; It is the one wild place in a world of rules and set tasks This chapter seeks to uncover the development...
...A different version of this chapter appeared in the March 2018 issue of Cultural Politics.The study of luxury has most commonly and productively been associated with key concepts like conspicuous consumption, status rivalry, distinction...

Of space and time in California wine

The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

1

... constitutes luxury varies through time and space as well as being culturally and socioeconomically context specific (Armitage and Roberts 2016), it is interesting to examine the trajectory that certain goods take as they acquire such esteemed...

Being luxurious: On the Rolls-Royce Ghost Black Badge and beyond

John Armitage

John Armitage is Professor of Media Arts and co-director of the Winchester Luxury Research Group at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

1

... based on the acceptance of the division between the opulent temporalities and spatialities of the “super-rich” (Roberts 2019) and the impoverished temporalities and spatialities of what we might call the “super-poor.” Such divisions, when...

“The Collective”: Luxury in lounge space

The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

0

...This chapter is about the role of luxury in the design, production, and marketing of home and community. It examines a novel housing block containing 550 dwellings, which opened in north London in April 2016. Our study of this block...

The architecture of authoritarian luxury

The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

0

...Ontic luxury things and ontological luxury space In his Origin of German Tragic Drama (2009), Walter Benjamin reflects upon the condition of tyranny in early modern German drama. The king sits uncomfortably upon his throne. The world...

Inhabiting luxury spaces

The Third Realm of Luxury : Connecting Real Places and Imaginary Spaces

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020

Book chapter

0

...There all is order, and beauty,Luxury, peace and pleasureOver half a century ago, in Mythologies (1957), Roland Barthes defined luxury as “le mousseux”: in other words, whatever is foamy, frothy, light, airy, and useless. Looking at how...